Posts Tagged 'leadership'

Leading through uncertainty: HBR July/August 2009

Reading this article in the most recent Harvard Business Review brought to mind dog agility tests. The dog, usually an Australian Shepard, runs manically, through the uprights, over the tipping bridge, under a log and through a canvas tunnel to reach the end line for a tiny reward:  small kibbles.

We, owners of remodeling companies, employees of remodeling companies and the myriad consultants, groupies and hangers on, of whom I count myself one, might be feeling like that dog right now.  Running, jumping, leaping and navigating tight quarters, often in the dark, to receive a tiny reward, at least tiny compared to two years ago.

Some perspective on the matter, however, might cheer us all:  if you’re still in business, if you’ve got sufficient cash flow, if you count hard working and engaged employees in your group, and among your clients satisfied long-term relationships, if your health is good and your family safe — you’re a lucky person!  And, just like that dog, ready to run the current obstacle course.

So let’s take this one step at a time.  One of the GREAT articles in the current Harvard Business Review is Leadership in a (Permanent) Crisis (page 62). The first paragraph reads:

“It would be profoundly reassuring to view the current economic crisis as simply another rough spell that we need to get through.  Unfortunately, though, today’s mix of urgency, high stakes, and uncertainty will continue as the norm even after the recession ends.”

Further on, it states:

“Crisis leadership has two distinct phases.  First is that emergency phase, when your task is to stabilize the situation and buy time.  Second is the adaptive phase, when you tackle the underlying causes of the crisis and build the capacity to thrive ina new reality.”

I hope by now most of us have stabilized:  gone through the heart-wrenching difficult tasks of letting people go, of changing the rent structure – perhaps even moving the office back into the home – and built a “starvation” company budget for the remainder of 2009.

Now comes phase two, “the adaptive phase”.  In this phase we’ll have to determine our new reality by re-thinking what we sell, to whom and how we sell it and how to best produce great outcome both in terms of customer satisfaction and quality construction.  Efficiencies, both in the production process itself as well as in economics of scale, should be put under the microscope for improvement.

Tackle, as always, the issues with the biggest payback first, leaving less vital considerations to fall off the ‘todo’ list over time.

Start now, prepare for the future by engaging your brain as well as your employee’s brains, ask your customers what they need most immediately and what they hope for down the road.

“Jack be nimble” should be our new mantra.  Starting today!

[Download reprint RO907F from HBR.org]

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